Jun 14

EU Take Legal Action in Migrant Crisis

There are increasing signs of a rift across the EU about how to deal with the migrant crisis. The European Commission have resorted to a legal challenge against Hungary, Poland and the Czech republic for their failure in taking in asylum seekers. The issue is likely to escalate as there is no real consensus for dealing with this issue among the 28 nations.

The governments in Poland and Hungary are particularly steadfast in their refusal to follow the migrant agreement. The idea was to help the front line countries like Greece and Italy who are being flooded with asylum seekers.

Similarly the Czech Republic agreed only to take 12 people and then indicated they would take no more. The ex-communist countries seem to be the worst in keeping to these agreements and it’s likely that this will cause increasing ill will among the community.

The EU migration officer, Dimitris Avramopoulos has told a news conference that they have made repeated call to these countries to little response.  These have been broadcast throughout Europe but you’ll need an EU based video proxy to access from outside these countries.

The commission has said the legal avenue was related to infringement procedures which is the method to punish countries who don’t meet their obligations.It’s not an easy option for the EU and is liely to lead to years of legal arguments before any penalties or fines can be imposed.

Some countries have been quick to criticise this approach which is likely to lead to increased political tensions and divisions within the community.  The Polish government for instance is ready to defend it’s position in the courts.  The EU is keen to keep unity among the remaining nations particularly due to the Brexit crisis.

However beyond the EU borders there are also issues with Russia and an problematic relationship with the USA.  The problem is that the arguments have continued for nearly two years now with little change. EU leaders feel that legal action is the only way to break the stalemate.  Most of the nations involved simply do not agree with the relocation system.

They are particularly concerned with the security issues that it raises, something that terrorist attacks in the UK and France have heightened. The reality is that these nations are benefiting greatly from the economic stability and investment of the European Union, so are likely to back down eventually.